Film Titles, Colorization and the National Film Registry

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misteranalog
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Film Titles, Colorization and the National Film Registry

Unread post by misteranalog » Thu Aug 15, 2013 10:17 am

I am contemplating adding new psychedelic tint colors to one or two public domain silent films such as 'The Lost World' (1925) which it turns out is on the National Film Registry. Some people might argue that adding new tint colors constitutes a form of colorization. The law "“Prohibits any person from knowingly distributing or exhibiting to the public a film that has been materially altered, or a black and white film that has been colorized and is included in the Registry, unless such films are labeled disclosing specified information.”

My question is: what sort of 'specified information' should I include on the package and on the film?
My initial reaction is to rename it 'The Lost World, now in tinted color' or something similar.
Has anyone had any experience with this sort of thing? Or know of a film whose labeling I can use as a model?

earlytalkie
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Re: Film Titles, Colorization and the National Film Registry

Unread post by earlytalkie » Thu Aug 15, 2013 1:30 pm

I'm not sure what is required here, but Legend Films gives each of their colorized movies a new title. For example, Swing Parade of 1946 is simply titled Swing Parade for the new version. Beyond Tomorrow is now known as Beyond Christmas by Legend. I am assuming that neither of these titles are in copyright, but neither are they on the National Film Registry. I would try Our Lost World or something similar if I had to do a subtle title change.

Jay Schwartz
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Re: Film Titles, Colorization and the National Film Registry

Unread post by Jay Schwartz » Sat Aug 17, 2013 11:03 am

I'm surprised to learn about this detail of the National Film Registry act -- and would be more surprised if there has ever been one instance of enforcement. Anybody? I'm pretty certain this clause has been violated, knowingly or other.

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FrankFay
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Re: Film Titles, Colorization and the National Film Registry

Unread post by FrankFay » Sat Aug 17, 2013 12:27 pm

It seems to me that all you need to do is be up front and specific that your version has been colorized.
Eric Stott

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misteranalog
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Re: Film Titles, Colorization and the National Film Registry

Unread post by misteranalog » Mon Aug 19, 2013 1:43 pm

Here is the legally required label for colorized films in the Registry, must appear on both the package and at the start of the film:

"This is a colorized version of a film originally marketed and distributed to the public in black and white It has been altered without the participation of the principal director screenwriter and other creators of the original film."

There are also similar labeling laws for "materially altered" films other than colorized films........

All Darc
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Re: Film Titles, Colorization and the National Film Registry

Unread post by All Darc » Tue Aug 27, 2013 5:29 pm

Interesting would be to get a Cinecolor talkie film (color system based in two primary colors and with limited color pallete) and using colorization technology rotoscope each object in a scene and try to individual color balance or change the color, in a way to try reproduce a full color spectrum.
Since it would not entirelly colorized itself, but rather trying to alter, balance or change hue, preserving as much as possible the original bubt variables, it would probably end up looking more natural than a fully colorized film itself.

Would that also give a new copright???


Imagine films like this in a full color spectrum:

http://www.blu-ray.com/movies/Flat-Top- ... 05/#Review" target="_blank" target="_blank
Keep thinking...

Image

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misteranalog
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Re: Film Titles, Colorization and the National Film Registry

Unread post by misteranalog » Thu Aug 29, 2013 1:22 pm

The general rule is that if you add something that was not there before, it constitutes a material alteration of the movie providing you can see something that was not there before. Turning a two-strip color film into a three-strip color film is a major change. I think the rule as that you had to label a film if it was on the National Film Registry. Turner puts the label on all colorized movies, probably because a movie that is not on the National Film Registry list this year might get put on it next year, so the are prepared for whatever might come.

All Darc
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Re: Film Titles, Colorization and the National Film Registry

Unread post by All Darc » Fri Oct 03, 2014 9:31 pm

That's a huge alteration:


http://anguscarroll.wordpress.com/2012/ ... -da-vinci/" target="_blank



But quite interesting...
Keep thinking...

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