What is the last film you watched? (2018)

Open, general discussion of classic sound-era films, personalities and history.
wich2
Posts: 1574
Joined: Tue Apr 08, 2014 11:11 am

Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

Unread post by wich2 » Fri Mar 09, 2018 11:32 am

Donald Binks wrote:You'd think the man would leave well alone and just acknowledge that David Suchet was Poirot and get on and do something else.
Yeah - and what was with that cheeky Brett fellow, trying to steal Rathbone's thunder?!

:wink:

User avatar
MaryGH
Posts: 326
Joined: Thu May 14, 2015 6:10 pm
Location: FL
Contact:

Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

Unread post by MaryGH » Fri Mar 09, 2018 9:28 pm

The Secret Life of Kathy McCormick (1988)

Been way too long since I saw this fun romantic comedy with Barbara Eden and Josh Taylor. Can't believe she's 12 years older than him and certainly doesn't look it, LOL. Love the Mary McFadden fashions that Barbara wears, too. Not bad for a made-for-tv movie.
Petition: Turner Enter./Warner Bros: Please digitalize Tom Tyler's FBO silent film westerns

http://bit.ly/2ueCvHe
---
Aventuras de Tom Tyler

http://triggertomblog.blogspot.com/

Online
User avatar
boblipton
Posts: 6377
Joined: Fri Jan 18, 2008 8:01 pm
Location: Clement Clarke Moore's Farm

Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

Unread post by boblipton » Sat Mar 10, 2018 7:40 am

TCM Underground had a couple of drive-in movies last night that I looked at this morning. The first was Macon County Line (1974), that Max Baer Jr. wrote and produced to get away from his Jethro Bodeen image. It didn't work, but it made him a mintload of money, which must have been of some comfort. Alan and Geoffrey Vint are a couple of guys on leave from the army. They pick up Cheryl Waters and are on their way out, but their fuel pump breaks down. When a pair of drifters murders sheriff Baer's wife, the three leads are thought to be guilty. The performances are good and, set in the Eisenhower era, there is an appealing mix soundtrack music, old cars and underdog heroes, making this an understandable breakout indie hit.

Its director, Richard Compton, tried to catch lightning in a bottle a second time, with the slicker and much more obviously calculated Return to Macon County (1975). Don Johnson and Nick Nolte (in a James Dean red windbreaker) are on their way to California in a souped up car for the races. They pick up Robin Mattson, get into a drag race with some other guys, run a police blockade, all to 1950s tunes, casual gun use and partial nudity.

Bob
Life's too short to sit on our rears watching other people's work.
— Bob Fells

wingate
Posts: 280
Joined: Sun Jun 01, 2014 2:06 am

Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

Unread post by wingate » Sat Mar 10, 2018 12:23 pm

Strip Strip Hooray,not à nudest review but a musical short from BIP made in 1932

earlytalkiebuffRob
Posts: 3470
Joined: Tue Oct 15, 2013 11:53 am

Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

Unread post by earlytalkiebuffRob » Sat Mar 10, 2018 1:14 pm

Donald Binks wrote:
drednm wrote:
boblipton wrote:[

Worst of all is the theft of Sir C. Aubrey Smith's eyebrows, to be worn like fetid fetishes beneath Branagh's nostrils.

Bob
Pretty bad. Even worse is that he's returning in Death on the Nile.
Ugh! Oh, for Gosh's sake! You'd think the man would leave well alone and just acknowledge that David Suchet was Poirot and get on and do something else.
And if one wants to nit-pick, of course Margaret Rutherford could be said to have 'played' Poirot in MURDER AT THE GALLOP and MURDER MOST FOUL...

The other thing which strikes me is not whether Suchet was or wasn't the best Poirot (and the TV episodes vary a lot in entertainment value*), it's that poor old Agatha has been done to death on the box, and like Donald, I would agree that they could have a go at another detective as there are many (Dr Priestley, Dr Thorndyke**, Inspectors French, Meredith, Arnold and Littlejohn) who have rarely or never been played on screen.

*Aside from THE ABC MURDERS, I much prefer the shorter Poirots to the feature-length ones.
**Was Mel Brook's 'Dr Thorndyke' in HUGH ANXIETY an 'in'-joke??

User avatar
oldposterho
Posts: 618
Joined: Wed Jan 22, 2014 10:05 am
Contact:

Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

Unread post by oldposterho » Sat Mar 10, 2018 7:21 pm

Been on an Edward G. Robinson tear lately starting with Larceny, Inc.and The Amazing Dr. Clitterhouse (which I had somehow confused with Dr. Ehrlich's Magic Bullet), both breezy gangster films Ed could walk through by that point but still immensely enjoyable.

The revelation was Mervyn LeRoy's 1932 Two Seconds. Clearly based on a stage play it is opened up by some visually exciting cinematography, including one shot that is gasp out loud good. Robinson is in full screw loose, head case mode and Vivienne Osborne is a quintessential pre-Code rotten dame. A little talky but worth it.

Online
User avatar
boblipton
Posts: 6377
Joined: Fri Jan 18, 2008 8:01 pm
Location: Clement Clarke Moore's Farm

Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

Unread post by boblipton » Sun Mar 11, 2018 12:32 pm

I never read Madeleine L'Engle's A Wrinkle in Time, nor any of its four sequels. My interest in science fiction had been kindled by the time it was published by Mr. Bass of the Mushroom Planet, Heinlein's juveniles and the Holt Rinehart series with the great Alex Schomburg endpapers. As time went on and people spoke of the book, it was in terms that did not fire my imagination. It seemed to me that it was of the wish-fulfillment adventure fantasy that Andre Norton worked in, and I did not care for Norton's work.


As a result, when my cousin and I decided to see A Wrinkle in Time (2018) this morning, I was able to approach it without any preconceptions engendered by my familiarity with the material in other forms. No sense of outrage that Michael Keaton has been cast as a Batman with chubby cheeks, no contempt for anyone who thinks elves' ears are that pointy, none of the million and one indignities we are subject to because our slightest whims are not heeded without the bother of our having to even think of them! They could change the story around entirely, and I wouldn't have the least idea, but would judge the movie on its own merits.

I was mildly bored throughout by a universe in which the love of tween girls is the most powerful force in the universe. In a universe where girls love their younger brother who is smarter them they. I've been a smart younger brother. I can assure you, it is not an endearing quality.

It was clear to me that this movie was made to cater to young girls, probably those who loved the books. Since I wasn't a young girl. never had been one, and probably never will be one, it wasn't intended for me. On the way out, I saw a young girl and an adult woman leaving and consulted with them. The younger thought it was good. The elder agreed with me when I used the word "gooey".

Bob
Life's too short to sit on our rears watching other people's work.
— Bob Fells

User avatar
drednm
Posts: 7650
Joined: Thu Jul 02, 2009 9:41 pm
Location: Belgrade Lakes, ME

Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

Unread post by drednm » Mon Mar 12, 2018 6:22 am

Too Much, Too Soon (1958) is a Warners film based on the book by Diana Barrymore and tells of her crash and burn into alcoholism and multiple suicide attempts. The film seems to have come out while the book was still hot off the press. Both Carroll Baker and Natalie Wood were considered for the lead role before Dorothy Malone ended up with it. Because of the times, the story was "whitewashed" a bit but has a couple scenes that pack a wallop. Malone was a hot property of the moment, having won a supporting Oscar for Written on the Wind in 1957. It seems Frederic March was the top contender for the supporting role of John Barrymore, but Errol Flynn ended up with it. Neva Patterson plays the odd mother, the poetess Michael Strange, whose real name was Blanche Oelrichs. Others in the cast are Efrem Zimbalist, Martin Milner, Ray Danton, Kathleen Freeman, Edward Kemmer, Murray Hamilton. Contemporary reviews seemed to be quite bad, defensive, and outright nasty, especially in the casting of Flynn as Barrymore. The hideous mansion posing as Barrymore's house was once owned by Pola Negri.
Ed Lorusso
Writer/Historian
-------------
https://wordpress.com/view/silentroomdo ... dpress.com" target="_blank

User avatar
s.w.a.c.
Posts: 2126
Joined: Mon Jul 28, 2008 2:27 pm
Location: The Land of Evangeline

Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

Unread post by s.w.a.c. » Mon Mar 12, 2018 7:30 am

On a similar note to Too Much, Too Soon, finally watched Robert Wise's I Want to Live! (1955), with a powerhouse performance by Susan Hayward as jazz baby Barbara "Bloody Babs" Graham, who went to the gas chamber for the murder of Mable Monahan during a robbery with a group of creepy co-conspirators. A friend loaned me his Twilight Time blu-ray, after I'd just DVR'd it from TCM, but worth it to get the sharp B&W cinematography of Lionel Lindon (a favourite of John Frankenheimer) in HD. The facts of the case as portrayed in the film may be questionable (the actual Monahan murder is never shown since that would remove any doubt of Graham's involvement), but Hayward's performance is unforgettable, and was justifiably rewarded with an Academy Award (the film received another five nominations), and the jazz score spearheaded by Johnny Mandel and Gerry Mulligan is terrific. The final segment of the film, which details the moments leading up to Graham's execution, is still excruciating as the minutes tick by, and apparently very true-to-life.

Another title I can't believe it took me so long to get around to.
Twinkletoes wrote:Oh, ya big blister!

User avatar
Mike Gebert
Site Admin
Posts: 6165
Joined: Sat Dec 15, 2007 3:23 pm
Location: Chicago
Contact:

Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

Unread post by Mike Gebert » Mon Mar 12, 2018 9:04 am

I never read Madeleine L'Engle's A Wrinkle in Time, nor any of its four sequels. My interest in science fiction had been kindled by the time it was published by Mr. Bass of the Mushroom Planet, Heinlein's juveniles and the Holt Rinehart series with the great Alex Schomburg endpapers.
Interesting that you should mention it in that context. I used to play audiobooks of the better sort of midcentury kid lit in the car on the way to school for my kids, Rosemary Sutcliffe on Roman Britain and Heinlein juveniles and so on, with the occasional Huck Finn or Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy thrown in. Anyway, Wrinkle in Time was one, and they liked it okay but felt that maybe it was a bit too young and fairy tale-ish for them by the time we got to it. On the other hand, they loved loved loved all the practical details of Heinlein's Little House in the Galaxy books, especially Farmer in the Sky. As did I.
“I'm in favor of plagiarism. If we are to create a new Renaissance, the government should encourage plagiarism. When convinced that someone is a true plagiarist, we should immediately award them the Legion of Honor.” —Jean Renoir

Online
User avatar
boblipton
Posts: 6377
Joined: Fri Jan 18, 2008 8:01 pm
Location: Clement Clarke Moore's Farm

Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

Unread post by boblipton » Mon Mar 12, 2018 9:29 am

Mike Gebert wrote:
I never read Madeleine L'Engle's A Wrinkle in Time, nor any of its four sequels. My interest in science fiction had been kindled by the time it was published by Mr. Bass of the Mushroom Planet, Heinlein's juveniles and the Holt Rinehart series with the great Alex Schomburg endpapers.
Interesting that you should mention it in that context. I used to play audiobooks of the better sort of midcentury kid lit in the car on the way to school for my kids, Rosemary Sutcliffe on Roman Britain and Heinlein juveniles and so on, with the occasional Huck Finn or Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy thrown in. Anyway, Wrinkle in Time was one, and they liked it okay but felt that maybe it was a bit too young and fairy tale-ish for them by the time we got to it. On the other hand, they loved loved loved all the practical details of Heinlein's Little House in the Galaxy books, especially Farmer in the Sky. As did I.
Reading Heinlein has engendered in me a great respect for earthworms, and it pleases me we have a family plot. I hope they like me.

Bob
Life's too short to sit on our rears watching other people's work.
— Bob Fells

User avatar
drednm
Posts: 7650
Joined: Thu Jul 02, 2009 9:41 pm
Location: Belgrade Lakes, ME

Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

Unread post by drednm » Mon Mar 12, 2018 7:45 pm

Straight Is the Way (1934) from MGM tells the story of a Jewish family from Brooklyn welcoming home a son after 5 years in prison. Will he fall in with the bad guys again? Will he fall in with the old tramp of a girl friend again? This 60-minute wonder casts Franchot Tone as Benny Horowitz and May Robson as his old mum. There's also Karen Morley as the sad-sack Bertha who kinda looks after the old lady and pines for Benny. Gladys George playing the conniving girl friend, Jack LaRue and Nat Pendleton are old gang members, Akim Tamiroff the garage owner, C. Henry Gordon a copper, and Raymond Hatton plays Mendel the matchmaker (although Max Davidson is also listed as Mendel on IMDb). We also get glimpses of William Bakewell, Minerva Urecal, John Qualen, Grace Hayle, and Marc Lawrence. The casting is certainly odd, to say the least.
Ed Lorusso
Writer/Historian
-------------
https://wordpress.com/view/silentroomdo ... dpress.com" target="_blank

Daniel Eagan
Posts: 800
Joined: Wed Dec 19, 2007 7:14 am
Contact:

Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

Unread post by Daniel Eagan » Tue Mar 13, 2018 8:13 am

boblipton wrote:The elder agreed with me when I used the word "gooey".

Bob
It was like being force-fed cotton-candy-colored kale.

User avatar
Mike Gebert
Site Admin
Posts: 6165
Joined: Sat Dec 15, 2007 3:23 pm
Location: Chicago
Contact:

Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

Unread post by Mike Gebert » Tue Mar 13, 2018 8:52 am

When I saw the trailer for A Fantastic Woman, which shortly thereafter won the Best Foreign Language Oscar, I didn't realize that star Daniela Vega was transgender. I thought it was a movie about a mistress whose married lover suddenly drops dead—which it is, albeit with that extra plot point. Anyway, if not for being set in Santiago, it could be a TV movie from the 90s, about the lack of legal rights the non-recognized partner in an LGBT relationship has. But being set in Latin America, in some ways it's about a society behind our times in which Daniel-now-Marina is not accepted, and is occasionally brutalized, sometimes by thugs (the son and his homophobic friends trying to get Marina out of the apartment she shared with his dad), sometimes by more official representatives of society (the best and most chilling scenes involve a superficially sympathetic, but also borderline-fascistic, female cop who comes at Marina with preconceptions like a ton of bricks).

So for that it's more interesting than the TV movie, and also for Daniela Vega's big, warmhearted and sympathetic performance. She's the whole show—which is good and bad, you see it all from her point of view, struggling with grief when no one has time for her to have it, indeed, no one really believes she can have had real feelings from such a "perverse" (as it's called more than once) relationship. The downside of that is that there aren't really other characters in the movie, just the beginning sketches of them. I was alert to this because it's the same criticism I had of another gay film at this year's Oscars, Call Me By Your Name, which is minutely alert to the feelings of the gay characters yet treats the main character's mom as if she's a servant out of focus in the background, the girlfriend he briefly has along the way as if she's just a bit of local color, and so on. It is possible to focus on your gay main characters, and yet make living breathing people out of the others—Brokeback Mountain, for instance, has lots of sharply defined bit parts, from Randy Quaid's employer ("I got no work for you") to Heath Ledger's girlfriend at the end who can't figure out why she can't get through to him, and is deeply sad about it, not to mention the hair-raising cynicism of Anne Hathaway's ex-wife when Ledger calls her after Gyllenhaal's death. Fully realized supporting characters dimensionalize the gay characters' worlds, and in both of these cases, their stories felt a little thinner for having fewer reverberations on people around them.

Nevertheless, Vega's performance is outstanding, fully lived-in and one of the best of the year. See it for that.
“I'm in favor of plagiarism. If we are to create a new Renaissance, the government should encourage plagiarism. When convinced that someone is a true plagiarist, we should immediately award them the Legion of Honor.” —Jean Renoir

Online
User avatar
boblipton
Posts: 6377
Joined: Fri Jan 18, 2008 8:01 pm
Location: Clement Clarke Moore's Farm

Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

Unread post by boblipton » Tue Mar 13, 2018 3:25 pm

When Columbia decided to produce its first film in England, The Lady is Willing (1934), they made their usual canny and economical choices. After casting Leslie Howard in the lead and Cedric Hardwicke as the villain, they cast some up-and-coming talent like Binnie Barnes and Nigel Bruce. Gilbert Miller, who would become a distinguished stage producer, directed, and Joe Walker, Capra's favorite director was shipped over to Elstree.

The story, as adopted by Guy Bolton, is a bit of fluff: Hardwicke is a stock swindler, whose latest venture has gone bust and private detective Leslie Howard is recruited to get the investors' money back. His plan is to persuade Hardwicke that he wants to buy a property owned by his wife, Miss Barnes, for an outrageous sum, then kidnap the lady before her signature can be obtained. The ransom set will be the losses of the investors. However, Miss Barnes has a mind and grudges of her own....

Visually it's fine. I credit not only Walker, but set designer Oscar Werndorff. However, there is something off about the performances. Lines are tossed off too fast, as if nothing has any real emotional weight. In a year when Screwball Comedy was beginning to take shape in the United States -- and with the sexual quadrille between Howard, Barnes, Hardwicke and Kendall Lee as Hardwicke's mistress, it was made for screwball -- this is 1920s stage farce without the door slamming, with Howard donning military uniforms and beards and switching Hardwicke's spectacles to confuse him. I'm sure everyone shrugged their shoulders, said it was fine for a first effort and moved on. Miss Barnes and Mr. Bruce got footholds in the US, and everyone continued to work thereafter, usually in better projects.

Bob
Life's too short to sit on our rears watching other people's work.
— Bob Fells

User avatar
Donald Binks
Posts: 3172
Joined: Fri Jun 17, 2011 10:08 am
Location: Somewhere, over the rainbow

Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

Unread post by Donald Binks » Tue Mar 13, 2018 3:32 pm

When you combine a group of great comedy actors with a deliciously dark and pitch black script, you come up with something like "Death of Stalin" (2017) which is a brilliant re-enactment of a rather macabre event.

This film portrays a land where the plot has been completely lost. It is being run by a gang of thugs, each with his own agenda. Each has his own list of people he is to do away with - if he ever gets sufficient power. Each are on the other's list. Meanwhile while they all await "their time", they occupy themselves with routinely having ordinary people either shot or sent away to a gulag.

Then the big chief Runamuck keels over and has a serious stroke. Panic sets in, for no-one really knows what to do - let alone run the country. As an example of how rich the darkness of the comedy is, one need go no further than the scene in which the henchmen try to summon the top doctors to treat the ailing dictator only to find out they have all been shot!

The grimness of the truth surrounding the story has had its overbearing harshness softened by the comedy, but that is not to say it is not highlighted. We are concious of what is really going on all around us, but thankfully, we are not drawn too deeply into it.

Adrian McLoughlin plays Stalin as a cockney spiv. No better way to bring out even more of the satire. Then there is Simon Russell Beale as Beria, an intense little pince-neyed stomach on two legs who seems to think every second person is a traitor. Perhaps one of the reasons why so many people are being shot. Jeffrey Tambor delightfully plays a vain and nervous wreck as Malenkov; Steve Buscemi, who has lately played a gangster in a TV series could not be a better choice as Kruschev and Michael Palin acts out an insipid Molotov.

The audience really wants to laugh out loud at all that is happening, but sometimes that laughter is somewhat stifled, for one realises that this is real people and real people who were needless murdered by a hideous regime.

Still, it is a very well made satire - one that made me afterwards bow my head as I passed a picture of my Queen, thankful that my country has so far been immune from such awfulness.
Regards from
Donald Binks

"So, she said: "Elly, it's no use letting Lou have the sherry glasses..."She won't appreciate them,
she won't polish them..."You know what she's like." So I said:..."

User avatar
drednm
Posts: 7650
Joined: Thu Jul 02, 2009 9:41 pm
Location: Belgrade Lakes, ME

Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

Unread post by drednm » Wed Mar 14, 2018 6:04 am

Yet another of the Oscar anointed that I thought was hysterically overrated is Call Me By Your Name, which won a screenplay award for James Ivory. I certainly do not begrudge the recognition given to Ivory, a long-time filmmaker with three Oscar nominations for directing, but this film is overly long by about 45 minutes. At 2 hours and 11-14 minutes (the endless closing credits), it just drags along with nothing happening. Yes, pretty to look at with its idyllic northern Italian summer, but the coming-of-age story takes way too long to get to the point. Timothee Calamet is quite good and Armie Hammer (where do they get these names?) less so, as they play cat and mouse about the villa. Michael Stuhlbarg as the intellectual father seems to be channeling Robin Williams and the mother (Amira Casar) channels Catherine Keener. Anyway, Ivory finally won his Oscar. He also was among the producers of this film. For my money (ha ha), give me A Room with a View any day.
Ed Lorusso
Writer/Historian
-------------
https://wordpress.com/view/silentroomdo ... dpress.com" target="_blank

wich2
Posts: 1574
Joined: Tue Apr 08, 2014 11:11 am

Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

Unread post by wich2 » Wed Mar 14, 2018 8:55 am

drednm wrote:Armie Hammer (where do they get these names?)
In his case, it's a part of the long-standing Snob Class tradition of, "We must retain the family (or families) name, wot?" He's descended from oligarch Armand Hammer, and his father also bore both names!

User avatar
drednm
Posts: 7650
Joined: Thu Jul 02, 2009 9:41 pm
Location: Belgrade Lakes, ME

Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

Unread post by drednm » Wed Mar 14, 2018 7:46 pm

Love Letters (1945) is not the goopy romance film it sounds like. It's actually a very good post-war noirish love story with a Gothic touch and a murder set in rural England. Jennifer Jones stars as an amnesia victim who goes by the name of Singleton. Joseph Cotten is a burned-out war vet who used to write love letters to a girl name Victoria for his boorish army friend (Robert Sully). Then there's Cecil Kellaway as the housekeeper, Gladys Cooper as a stroke victim, Ann Richards as a Bloomsbury Girl, and Anita Louise as a jilted girl friend. Nicely done!
Ed Lorusso
Writer/Historian
-------------
https://wordpress.com/view/silentroomdo ... dpress.com" target="_blank

User avatar
s.w.a.c.
Posts: 2126
Joined: Mon Jul 28, 2008 2:27 pm
Location: The Land of Evangeline

Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

Unread post by s.w.a.c. » Thu Mar 15, 2018 6:24 am

One of the last features by director Robert Florey (he made the Lugosi-starring Murders in the Rue Morgue, among many others) before settling into a prodigious career in TV, The Crooked Way (1949) is a solid noir, with cinematography by John Alton, about a war vet with amnesia (John Payne as "Eddie Rice") who starts to uncover his criminal past. Perhaps most notable for providing the inimitable Sonny Tufts with one of his best roles, as snarling crime boss Vince Alexander, who gets to go out in a blaze of glory. Payne is rather underwhelming in the lead, but between Alton's dramatic setups and lovely Ellen Drew as the wife Eddie forgot he had, there's enough there to make a brisk 80 minutes go by quickly.
Twinkletoes wrote:Oh, ya big blister!

User avatar
Jim Roots
Posts: 2952
Joined: Wed Jan 09, 2008 2:45 pm
Location: Ottawa, ON

Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

Unread post by Jim Roots » Thu Mar 15, 2018 9:31 am

s.w.a.c. wrote:One of the last features by director Robert Florey (he made the Lugosi-starring Murders in the Rue Morgue, among many others) before settling into a prodigious career in TV, The Crooked Way (1949) is a solid noir, with cinematography by John Alton, about a war vet with amnesia (John Payne as "Eddie Rice") who starts to uncover his criminal past. Perhaps most notable for providing the inimitable Sonny Tufts with one of his best roles, as snarling crime boss Vince Alexander, who gets to go out in a blaze of glory. Payne is rather underwhelming in the lead, but between Alton's dramatic setups and lovely Ellen Drew as the wife Eddie forgot he had, there's enough there to make a brisk 80 minutes go by quickly.
Somebody -- Eddie Muller? -- could write an entire book about all the noirs that use the ol' amnesia plot.

I would sign this posting, but I forget my name.

User avatar
s.w.a.c.
Posts: 2126
Joined: Mon Jul 28, 2008 2:27 pm
Location: The Land of Evangeline

Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

Unread post by s.w.a.c. » Fri Mar 16, 2018 5:31 pm

Sprightly pre-code soaper Beauty for Sale (1933) isn't a bad way to spend 87 minutes, investigating the lives of ladies who work at a high class beauty salon, led by lovely Madge Evans, perennial 1930s nice girl, who falls for a married lawyer played by Otto Kruger, whose wife Henrietta (Alice Brady) is something of a nutbar, obsessed with numerology (even though she stinks at math) and always fussing over her Pekinese pooch. Her fellow employees are often on the lookout for sugar daddies, usually among the husbands of their clients, with Una Merkel knowing how to play the game and Florine McKinney falling victim to it when a not-so-blessed event rears its head. Evans comes across as very natural here, and she and Kruger have some genuine chemistry as their friendship blossoms into forbidden love.

Director Richard Boleslawski, who died before his time at the age of 47 in 1937, delivers with some panache, with moving camera and focus-pulling shots that give the film more visual oomph than its story probably deserves. I didn't recognize his name at first, but later saw he directed Les Miserables, The Garden of Allah and Theodora Goes Wild, not a bad resume before his untimely passing.
Twinkletoes wrote:Oh, ya big blister!

User avatar
drednm
Posts: 7650
Joined: Thu Jul 02, 2009 9:41 pm
Location: Belgrade Lakes, ME

Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

Unread post by drednm » Fri Mar 16, 2018 7:37 pm

Film Stars Don't Die in Liverpool (2017) didn't make a dent in the US market but apparently found an audience in the UK where it got 4 BAFTA nominations. Annette Bening stars as Gloria Grahame in her quirky and troubled last days, appearing in plays in England and involved with a guy (Jamie Bell) 30 years her junior. Story takes place after she had divorced from her former step-son. Julie Walters and Vanessa Redgrave also appear.
Ed Lorusso
Writer/Historian
-------------
https://wordpress.com/view/silentroomdo ... dpress.com" target="_blank

Online
User avatar
boblipton
Posts: 6377
Joined: Fri Jan 18, 2008 8:01 pm
Location: Clement Clarke Moore's Farm

Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

Unread post by boblipton » Sat Mar 17, 2018 7:48 am

I have concluded that watching Old Mother Riley movies, like eating live frogs, should best be done first thing in the morning, to ensure that nothing worse will happen in your day. Unfortunately, by the time I noticed the availability for viewing of Old Mother Riley, Detective (1943), I had been up for some time, and it clashed with my dictum of getting unpleasant tasks out of the way as soon as possible.

In this one, Lancashire lad Arthur Lucan, who impersonated Old Mother Riley in drag, with his wife, Kitty McShane, playing his daughter, gets involved in tracking down black marketeers, His Majesty's police and spies being unable to do it on their own. There was clearly some money spent on this movie. Miss McShane introduces two songs, and there is a goodly amount of location shooting. Nonetheless the usual process shots, looping and other means of keeping production costs down are both obvious and destructive of any comedy.

It is true that the Old Mother Riley movies were enormously popular. Lucan had been voted the second most popular British screen personality in 1941, and he would appear as the character 17 times on the screen, with another movie planned when he collapsed on stage and died. Nonetheless, even with my old-fashioned taste for slapstick, I find the character, series and this movie irritating. The character screeches, and never ceases her stream of malapropisms; there is nothing to put me on the character's side except the writer-mandated inevitable success. The routine may have once been popular, but its time has long gone, and the lack of anything worthwhile in this film other than that outdated shtick should consign it to the trash heap.

Bob
Life's too short to sit on our rears watching other people's work.
— Bob Fells

R Michael Pyle
Posts: 1749
Joined: Wed May 27, 2009 1:10 pm

Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

Unread post by R Michael Pyle » Sat Mar 17, 2018 2:43 pm

I frankly don't know how you could have made it through that one, Bob. It's just atrocious!

Decided to re-watch "Big Business Girl" (1931) with Loretta Young, Ricardo Cortez, Frank Albertson, and others. Was well worth the re-watch. Enjoyed it.

User avatar
Donald Binks
Posts: 3172
Joined: Fri Jun 17, 2011 10:08 am
Location: Somewhere, over the rainbow

Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

Unread post by Donald Binks » Sat Mar 17, 2018 3:02 pm

boblipton wrote:I have concluded that watching Old Mother Riley movies.......should consign it to the trash heap.
Bob
From today's 'NEW YORK TIMES"

Sir Percy Abernathy-Folderoll, the British High Poobah for Cultural Affairs at the British Consulate in New York presented Mr. Bob Lipton with the "Orfull" award for having sat through a completely atrocious British picture. Sir Percy said that he was amazed Mr. Lipton was able to remain awake for the entire proceedings and to be relatively sane afterwards. Mr. Lipton in response said that he was grateful to receive the award in consideration of the horrid pictures he has had to sit through in an endeavour to be entertained.
Regards from
Donald Binks

"So, she said: "Elly, it's no use letting Lou have the sherry glasses..."She won't appreciate them,
she won't polish them..."You know what she's like." So I said:..."

User avatar
Donald Binks
Posts: 3172
Joined: Fri Jun 17, 2011 10:08 am
Location: Somewhere, over the rainbow

Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

Unread post by Donald Binks » Sat Mar 17, 2018 3:13 pm

If anyone was in any doubt as to the standard of picture I watch, they need have no problems in ascertaining my level when I disclose that last night I watched "Paddington 2" (2018).

I watched the first one some time back and enjoyed it, and I did this one too. It seems to me that with very few exceptions, the only really nice pictures being made today are those aimed at a children's audience.

Whilst the film is perhaps a complete lot of rot, it probably does confirm my belief that toys - especially Teddy Bears come alive at night when we humans are well away in the Land of Nod. Still, there is a heaping helping of syrupy charm to it all - and a deal of high camp as well - the scene at the end titles with Hugh Grant in pink as a song and dance man with a chorus line to boot, is quite over the top, but quite hilarious.

The fact that this film is packed full of great character actors and actresses - big names - goes a long way to prove that the producers were aiming at some degree of quality. I think they succeeded.
Regards from
Donald Binks

"So, she said: "Elly, it's no use letting Lou have the sherry glasses..."She won't appreciate them,
she won't polish them..."You know what she's like." So I said:..."

Online
User avatar
boblipton
Posts: 6377
Joined: Fri Jan 18, 2008 8:01 pm
Location: Clement Clarke Moore's Farm

Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

Unread post by boblipton » Sat Mar 17, 2018 3:27 pm

I decline the award with thanks, but it is too much, too little and sends a bad message. I did not watch the movie out of any hope of enjoyment, but out of a sense of duty towards my fellow Nitratevillains, that someone whom they could actually trust to have looked at the movie is the author of the opinion. This seems to contrary to the methodology of reviewing British films before 1948. It is, however, the only one I, or any movie lover should accept. Second, a bit of ribbon from a foreign government, no matter how apparent the good will with which it is offered, is contrary to to my understandings of loyalty to a nation which has been, by and large, very kind to my family and me. Third, there is no sum of money, nor award of honor for onerous service, that anyone could reasonably claim could compensate for the suffering involved. Finally, it encourages people to torment themselves in a bad cause in hope of some positive publicity, which I think is just justifying bad behavior.

For these reasons, let us speak no more of this matter.

Bob
Life's too short to sit on our rears watching other people's work.
— Bob Fells

User avatar
Robert W
Posts: 154
Joined: Fri Jan 07, 2011 4:12 pm
Location: Canada

Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

Unread post by Robert W » Sat Mar 17, 2018 7:11 pm

I second Mr. Bink's recommendation of Paddington 2, an utterly charming film that underplays so wonderfully compared to the hyperactive children's films mostly being made today.

Mr. Binks, I strongly recommend you take a look at Wonder, the Julia Roberts film starring a talented young actor named Jacob Tremblay who hails from my country. Although it is aimed at a young adult audience, it's as good as anything I saw in 2017 thanks to a message affirming a wonderful faith in the basic goodness of people. I think you might like it.

sherry
Posts: 130
Joined: Sun Oct 31, 2010 10:32 am

Re: What is the last film you watched? (2018)

Unread post by sherry » Sun Mar 18, 2018 2:29 am

I will watch Paddington 2 for Ben Miller ( I am a fan of Death in Paradise ).
He was also secretly in Johnny English Reborn. Such a pity they deleted his scenes :(
I would love to see him and Gillian Anderson in a movie together!

Post Reply